4 Merger strategies credit union directors should consider

first_img 22SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr by: Glen ChristensenMergers are transforming the credit union landscape.  It is, therefore, ever more important for credit union leadership to be addressing the impact of mergers as part of their strategic planning.The NCUA has clearly pronounced the duties of credit union directors including (1) responsibility for the overall direction of the credit union and (2) demonstrating good faith effort in acting in the best interests of the membership, and (3) administering the affairs of the credit union fairly and impartially.We have found the mergers can be particularly challenging issue for credit unions directors to address whether it be as an acquirer, merger of equals, or as the merged entity. Often issues arise because the board has not focused on this issue in a comprehensive manner from a strategy perspective. continue reading »last_img read more

Purposeful Talent Development: Be intentional about removing bias from your pipeline for people

first_img This post is currently collecting data… It has been wonderful to see so many organizations embracing and identifying ways they can further diversity, equity and inclusion internally and in their communities. We know that DEI is more than just helping people in an organization feel included and welcome. It’s also about broadening the pool of people we consider when making decisions about hiring or promotions.In 2020, we’ve seen an assertion that a “lack of black talent” is the reason for insufficient diversity in some organizations, especially in leadership positions. Truth is, if you can’t find talent that doesn’t look like you, you’re not giving your hiring efforts enough attention. Are you telling the same people you always tell when you have an open position when, if you think about it, you know people who might be able to help you broaden your candidate pool? Are you sending your job postings to the same places as always—to the same job sites, universities and recuiters? A great first step toward putting more diversity in your pipeline is to broadcast your job ads in different ways. Consider recruiting at historically black colleges and universities and reaching out to the National Black MBA Association, the National Association of African Americans in Human Resources, and the National Association of Black Accountants. The talent is there, if you look in the right places.Whether recruiting externally or identifying talent internally, another obstacle to having more diverse talent pipelines lies with the unconscious biases of those charged with hiring and developing talent. As the conversations deepen around the need to have a pipeline of diverse talent, those who hire and develop talent at credit unions need to shed light on and become aware of these biases, including: This is placeholder text continue reading »center_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Leading questions

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Wenger: We’re no shrinking violets

first_img Press Association Wenger, though, has no issue with fair, robust challenges which the French coach feels are “a strength of the English game”. “I don’t think it holds players back. In fact, the opposite, the foreign players who come to England improve and you get that aspect of the game as well,” he said. “I have seen so many French players complain about the physicality when they arrived in England. I tell them it will take some time, but the intensity of the game will make them better players. “It was worse 15 years ago than it is now, back then no-one would have spoken about the (Andy) Carroll challenge (on David De Gea), now everything is analysed on television. Some players complained and then, after they moved away, they missed the English game.” Wenger added: “When you look at some players, you cannot say the physicality of the game stops them from displaying their talent. “When I brought (Robert) Pires here, he was not especially a physical player, but no-one could stop him from playing his game – (Marc) Overmars, (Dennis) Bergkamp, nobody could stop them. You cannot say it is physical or it is kicking, it is just that the commitment is high and that is what you want.” Wenger, though, knows from painful experience just what the result of poor tackles can be. He said: “What I regret is when it goes overboard and we lost some players like Eduardo and (Abou) Diaby, who paid a high price for that aspect. It is a fine line, that is why I say it is the intention that counts.” The Gunners boss was less than impressed by some of the challenges from Everton on Tuesday night. Wenger’s current side may not be full of no-nonsense characters, but the Frenchman insists suggestions Arsenal lack players capable of standing up for themselves in the heat of battle are no longer valid. “I had teams who were not vulnerable to that (physical side), but when we built the stadium here, we were much younger, and of course vulnerable,” said Wenger. “(With players like Cesc) Fabregas, at 17 years of age, we were a bit more vulnerable at Stoke than we are today, that is natural.” center_img Arsenal manager Arsene Wenger maintains his team are no longer “vulnerable” to physical intimidation as they look to cement a place in the top four of the Barclays Premier League.last_img read more

Australian Open: Prize Money Tops £38m with Bigger Shares

first_imgThe tournament proper begins in Melbourne on 20 January.Tournament director Craig Tiley says the Australian Open is committed to “improving the pay and conditions for a deeper pool of international tennis players”.“We worked with the tours to establish the weighting for prize money increases round by round, and we pushed to reward players competing early in the tournament in both singles and doubles,” added Tiley.“We strongly believe in growing prize money at all levels of the game and we will continue to work with the playing group to create viable career paths in the sport and enable more players to make more money.”Singles champions at the 2020 tournament will take home 4.12m Australian dollars (£2.21m).The prize money for losing in the first round of qualifying is 20,000 Australian dollars (£10,707) and 90,000 Australian dollars (£48,183) for exiting in the first round main draw.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram Australian Open organisers have increased the prize money to more than £38m with the biggest gains for those losing in the earlier rounds.The overall prize fund for the tournament has increased by 14% to 71m Australian dollars (£38.1m).Players who exit in the first round will receive 20% more than last year while money for losers in the opening qualifying round is up by a third.last_img read more