‘Córdova’, the post-conflict weapon in Colombia

first_imgIndumil has sold more than 1,000 units of the Córdova domestically, each costing about $500 (USD). It’s selling well because it brings together the best qualities of well-known firearms — such as the barrel of the Bernardelli, the grip of the Sig Sauer and elements of the Pietro Beretta and the Taurus — Colombia’s Ministry of Defense said in a news release. In addition to manufacturing revolvers and shotguns, Indumil mass produces all types of munitions, including grenade launchers, long-distance mortars, and bombs which are used by the Air Force. The Colombian military industry has created the first pistol completely developed and produced in the country. Officials presented the gun to the public during the Expodefensa fair in October in Bogotá. “This is a gun completely designed and produced by Colombians and in Colombia. There has been no intervention by foreign persons in this process, not with information, nor with knowledge, only Colombians have worked on it,” Indumil General Manager Col. Néstor Raúl Espitia Rivero said. The colonel made his remarks as the handgun was presented at Expodefensa. Indumil aspires to become the main supplier of handguns in Colombia. About 5,000 to 6,000 handguns are sold in the country annually. As they did with that gun, Indumil officials plan on expanding on the capabilities of the Córdova. In 2015, Indumil plans on introducing the Tactical version, a weapon designed specifically for law enforcement officers. It will have a 15-round capacity and a 130.1 millimeter barrel. The company also plans on unveiling the Compact version of the pistol, a weapon which is designed for women. This will be smaller than the Tactical version, with a 94 millimeter barrel. In addition to being a high-precision weapon, the Córdova is ergonomically designed and can be used with equal ease by right-handers and left-handers. With the launch of the Córdova, Indumil is trying to increase its international sales. Ecuador, Paraguay, Honduras, Panama, and Guatemala have shown interest in acquiring batches of the gun. Chile and Peru are also potential new markets for the firearm. “The ACE Galil Rifle was something we developed with technological transfer from Israel,” said Espitia. “This is one of the most modern and light rifles on the market.” The Córdova evolved from a previous handgun, known as the Standard, which has a capacity of nine rounds. The company has also sold its wares internationally; for example, Colombian weapons engineers improved the Galil rifle, which is widely used by the Israeli military. “This year, as part of a strategic partnership with the United States, we have added the assembly and maintenance of monocular night vision equipment for our soldiers,” Espitia said. Great national ability, congratulations to the creative people of the Colombian Military Industry Congratulations to Indumil, finally they pinch themselves and get into a competitive market, but what counts is the quality of the weapon when it is being sold, the U.S. market is very big for this kind of weapon. What is important is the price. I think that it’s a bit high compared to the 10 best pistols on the market that are at an average of U.S. $450 to $600. It is very important to advertise in specialized magazines in defense-type weapons. Another very important thing is the weapons’ functioning under not very favorable circumstances, safety, the finishing of the weapon, a good importer would take charge of doing all the tests and the advertising campaign to police and security organizations. The power of weapons is good (very useful) for ensuring the security of orderly people and countries’ economies. All nations that value their sovereignty need to have a big and strong army. The success of a pistol lies in the following characteristics: proof of operations in sand, mud, water and releasing it from a height of 15 meters, tests with PLUS ”p” high force bullets. Safety is a very important factor, the weapon’s precision, its finish should be durable and resistant to rust, a smooth operation with a trigger that requires 7 pounds of pressure, and easy to carry. And it has to have an appearance that appeals to the buyer. If you want to get into the U.S. market, which is very big, you should advertise it in magazines such as HANDGUNS, GUNS& AMMO, with a good photo and a selling acronym “BEST COMBAT PISTOL”. If you can reach this market, sales will be very good. Much success. ACCORDING TO A VIDEO I SAW ON YOUTUBE, THIS WEAPON IS EXCELLENT WHEN SLOW SPEED AMMUNITION IS USED, BECAUSE WHEN HIGH SPEED AMMUNITION IS USED IT JAMS. THIS IS A GREAT DISADVANTAGE AGAINST ANOTHER PERSON WITH ANOTHER BRAND OF GUN. THEY HAVE TO BE BETTER PERFECTED….WITH ALL DUE RESPECT I THINK IT IS SO AND MORE SO IF THEY’RE GOING TO COMPETE WITH OTHER BRANDS THAT ARE ALREADY POSITIONED IN THE MARKET. Better weapons can be made with the help of another well-known company. The Córdova is a 9-mm semiautomatic handgun which weighs less than a kilogram designed to fire between nine and 15 rounds. It’s named after the Military Industry of Colombia (Indumil) plant General José María Córdova, a hero of Colombia’s fight for independence. The company is cooperating with the United States to produce equipment for the Colombian military. Decades of experience With the launch of the Córdova, Indumil is trying to increase its international sales. Ecuador, Paraguay, Honduras, Panama, and Guatemala have shown interest in acquiring batches of the gun. Chile and Peru are also potential new markets for the firearm. “The ACE Galil Rifle was something we developed with technological transfer from Israel,” said Espitia. “This is one of the most modern and light rifles on the market.” The company has also sold its wares internationally; for example, Colombian weapons engineers improved the Galil rifle, which is widely used by the Israeli military. “This year, as part of a strategic partnership with the United States, we have added the assembly and maintenance of monocular night vision equipment for our soldiers,” Espitia said. As they did with that gun, Indumil officials plan on expanding on the capabilities of the Córdova. In 2015, Indumil plans on introducing the Tactical version, a weapon designed specifically for law enforcement officers. It will have a 15-round capacity and a 130.1 millimeter barrel. The company also plans on unveiling the Compact version of the pistol, a weapon which is designed for women. This will be smaller than the Tactical version, with a 94 millimeter barrel. The Colombian military industry has created the first pistol completely developed and produced in the country. By Dialogo November 18, 2014 “This is a gun completely designed and produced by Colombians and in Colombia. There has been no intervention by foreign persons in this process, not with information, nor with knowledge, only Colombians have worked on it,” Indumil General Manager Col. Néstor Raúl Espitia Rivero said. The colonel made his remarks as the handgun was presented at Expodefensa. The company is cooperating with the United States to produce equipment for the Colombian military. In addition to manufacturing revolvers and shotguns, Indumil mass produces all types of munitions, including grenade launchers, long-distance mortars, and bombs which are used by the Air Force. For most of its 60 years, Indumil has focused on selling weapons domestically, with Colombia’s Armed Forces accounting for most of its sales. “This is a post-conflict weapon, which will be used by police, private companies and any individual who requires its use,” Indumil Director Luis Carlos Perdomo said. The weapon is functional and precise and can be used for personal defense and for target practice. The Córdova is a 9-mm semiautomatic handgun which weighs less than a kilogram designed to fire between nine and 15 rounds. It’s named after the Military Industry of Colombia (Indumil) plant General José María Córdova, a hero of Colombia’s fight for independence. In addition to being a high-precision weapon, the Córdova is ergonomically designed and can be used with equal ease by right-handers and left-handers. “This is a post-conflict weapon, which will be used by police, private companies and any individual who requires its use,” Indumil Director Luis Carlos Perdomo said. The weapon is functional and precise and can be used for personal defense and for target practice. Officials presented the gun to the public during the Expodefensa fair in October in Bogotá. Decades of experience Indumil has sold more than 1,000 units of the Córdova domestically, each costing about $500 (USD). It’s selling well because it brings together the best qualities of well-known firearms — such as the barrel of the Bernardelli, the grip of the Sig Sauer and elements of the Pietro Beretta and the Taurus — Colombia’s Ministry of Defense said in a news release. Indumil reaching out to new markets For most of its 60 years, Indumil has focused on selling weapons domestically, with Colombia’s Armed Forces accounting for most of its sales. Indumil reaching out to new markets The Córdova evolved from a previous handgun, known as the Standard, which has a capacity of nine rounds. Indumil aspires to become the main supplier of handguns in Colombia. About 5,000 to 6,000 handguns are sold in the country annually. last_img read more

Elvis On Long Island: The King and L.I.

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The lights dimmed and suddenly the packed Nassau Coliseum resounded with the opening chords of the 2001: Space Odyssey theme. Elvis Presley was in the house.The fans roared as the King of Rock and Roll took center stage. Their camera bulbs sparkled like diamonds in the arena darkness and radiated off Elvis’ rhinestone jumpsuit.“I remember all the lights flashing as he was coming out,” says Ellen Granelli, who was one of the lucky ones. “He had the audience in the palm of his hand for the entire time.”Granelli, who works at the Northport library, saw Elvis at Madison Square Garden in June 1972—the only time he ever played in Manhattan besides the Ed Sullivan Theater—and both times he came to Uniondale in June 1973 and July 1975. The three shows basically followed the same set list, but she didn’t mind “because it was Elvis! You wanted to be there!”Making a fashion statement all his own, Elvis Presley basks in the adoration of his fans at his Nassau Coliseum concert on July 19, 1975. his next show there was set for 1977 (see unused ticket at right).(Photo by Ron Galella/WireImage)Granelli was in her 20s then—today her three kids are in their 30s. She had tickets to see Elvis in August 1977 with her new husband as well as her girlfriend Mary Jo, who’d been her companion at the previous concerts. They never got the chance. She and her husband were driving through the mountains of Maine on vacation when Elvis was all they heard on their car radio. Strange, they thought, since he hadn’t had a top 10 hit in quite a while.“This isn’t good!” Granelli remembers thinking. Sadly, she was right.“I was talking to my children the other night…and I said I saw the older Elvis, and then I stopped myself!” she says. “Older Elvis! He died at 42—that’s not old!”On Aug. 16, 1977, less than a week before Elvis was to appear at the Coliseum—his first venue on the next leg of his tour that year—his girlfriend at the time, Ginger Alden, found him lying face-down on the shag carpet of his bathroom at Graceland, his famous mansion on Elvis Presley Boulevard in Memphis.Somewhere in Granelli’s Northport home are her unused tickets. Her kids tell her they’ve seen them there and she’s sure she hasn’t thrown them away. Her Elvis collection, which includes “every album” (some 33 recordings by her reckoning), is up in the attic, but she doesn’t play his songs much these days, in part because they’re on vinyl. Unlike a later TV generation who endured Elvis’ egregious movies broadcast in the Sixties, Granelli got her first look at “Elvis the Pelvis” (as the puritanical press pilloried him at the time) when he appeared on the Ed Sullivan Show in 1956.“I was a little girl—I was only nine,” she says with a laugh. “That’s where it all started. From the earlier years I thought he was just magnificent, charismatic and very talented.” But she had to wait to see Elvis perform live, and she grabbed every chance she could get, even though it was obvious that the Elvis of the Seventies wasn’t the same performer who’d set the rock and roll world ablaze in the 1950s.“He had a magnificent presence, even at that stage, that just kind of drew you in and took you to another place,” she says. “It was still Elvis, and it was still his voice.”She and her girlfriend never made it to the front of the stage where Elvis would ceremonially shed scarf after scarf to the adoring female fans reaching out to him, but it didn’t matter to Granelli. “If you’re a true fan, you understand that you can be in the zone in the last seat in the last row,” she says.On that fateful August morning in 1977 Steve Prisco—today Sam Ash Music’s marketing director—was driving to a ticket-scalper on Long Island to get front-row seats for the Nassau Coliseum show when he heard the news: The King was dead.A young guitarist growing up in Huntington Station, Prisco had acquired a taste for rockabilly music after looking through his older brothers’ record collections and getting turned on to the tracks Elvis had recorded at Sam Phillips’ Sun Studios in Memphis.“The power of that music really grabbed me,” he says. “Up to that point, Elvis was just the guy in those afternoon movies.”Prisco’s first guitar teacher was from Tennessee and had moved in right across the street. “He was a real good ole boy,” Prisco recalls. The teacher asked him who his favorite guitarist was. Prisco had read that the Young Rascals’ guitarist Gene Cornish had revered Scotty Moore, so Prisco repeated the name. “He looks at me, like, ‘Really?!’” Prisco recalls. “I had no idea who Scotty Moore was.” A few years later, he learned that Moore was the great sideman in Elvis’ Sun sessions, and so those seminal riffs he’d been learning in Huntington ran very deep indeed.ALL SHOOK UP: Steve Prisco (top) strikes a chord at the recent Elvis Show in Bay Shore while Chris James, in shades, hits the high note, Jenna Silverman croons with that special feeling, and Paul Schmitz (bottom) does it in style. (Photos by Ken Farrell)These days, through the New York Roots Music Association—NYRMA for short—Prisco has been the front man for “The Elvis Show,” Long Island’s longest-running Elvis tribute and charity event, which has raised more than $50,000 for food pantries over two decades. For the last three years in a row, they’ve sold out the YMCA Boulton Center for the Performing Arts in Bay Shore.Prisco got the idea for the first show when he realized that his rockabilly trio was going to be playing on Elvis’ Jan. 8th birthday.“We had a lot of friends who’d come down to see us—friends from other bands—and I always enjoyed having people come up on stage,” he says. “So that night I spread the word around that ‘Hey, we’re going to do a bunch of Elvis stuff, so come on down and come up and sing a song.’”It clicked, and the next year he decided to ask people to bring canned food to donate to local pantries for the hungry and homeless. And so the event grew from a little bar in Huntington to where it is today—with a hiatus in the ’90s—and it’s been going strong eight years in a row with dozens of performers. But it was always about Elvis and his songs. The cardinal rule, Prisco said, was: “No Elvis impersonators!” He understands that some fans fixate on the “whole mythology and campiness and that whole insane side” of the Elvis image, and that “the impersonators play into that,” but, for Prisco and his peers, it’s about being “true to the vibe.”No matter how his career was going on stage, Elvis always had his standards, according to his wife, Priscilla Presley, who divorced him in October 1973. As she wrote in her memoir, he “couldn’t abide singers who were, in his words, ‘all technique and no emotional feeling,’ and in this category he firmly placed Mel Torme and Robert Goulet. They were both responsible for two television sets being blown away with a .357 Magnum.”The recent NYRMA event in January delved into Elvis’ “deep catalogue and some odd-ball stuff,” Prisco says, but the music could stand on its own. “I think if you didn’t know it was an Elvis show, you would still have enjoyed it because of the level of the performances and the musicianship.”They did the King proud—and, in that spirit, it’s worth recalling how much the New York Times’ then-top music critic, John Rockwell, appreciated seeing and hearing Elvis himself when he last performed on Long Island almost 40 years ago.“Mr. Presley can still rock, and he felt like rocking a refreshing lot of the time Saturday at the Nassau Coliseum,” the critic wrote on July 21, 1975. “When this observer last saw Mr. Presley, it was also the Nassau Coliseum, two summers ago. Then he was fat, lazy and ineffectual. On Saturday he was still fat—fatter than ever, a blown-up cartoon of his spare 1950s toughness. But he wasn’t lazy, and he most certainly wasn’t ineffectual.”Granelli, who was also there that day, would no doubt agree with Rockwell’s assessment.“It appeared to me he had the same charisma that he had in the ‘50s and the early ‘60s but he was almost a caricature of himself in the performance,” she says. She blamed his management, Colonel Tom Parker in particular. “I don’t think [Elvis] was any longer true to who he really was,” she says. “He was what they were telling him he had to be.”Like many an Elvis afficionado, she believes he had tremendous talent but no coping skills to fend off the freeloaders.“He was the son of a sharecropper,” she says. “Where would he have learned any business acumen? So once Colonel Parker got into the picture, I think that started out to be a good thing but ultimately destroyed him.”Prisco says that though Parker took 50 percent of Elvis’ share, the performer never lacked anything he wanted—and he shouldn’t be held blameless for decisions that in retrospect limited his career, let alone his life. As for what Elvis achieved, Prisco believes that rock and roll really began when Elvis recorded “Mystery Train” in 1955.“That was it,” Prisco says. “Nothing had sounded truly like that before.”As Elvis profoundly changed American music, so too has the industry changed irrevocably—and Prisco believes there’s no going back to the days of “those big bangs—Sinatra, Elvis, the Beatles and, some people will say, Michael Jackson—that’s not going to happen anymore the way everything’s so fragmented now and so immediate. He’ll always have that.”Elvis has left the building, never to return, but his music is still rocking the halls.last_img read more

The Libertarian Case for Drug Prohibition

first_imgThe Public Discourse 28 January 2018Family First Comment: An excellent article….. “Recreational drug use interferes with clear thinking. The very activity is centered around the consumption of an intoxicating substance that impairs one’s cognition. The whole point is to impair one’s ability to think clearly, which in turn impairs one’s ability to act freely. Thus, recreational drugs should be legally restricted because their use is incompatible with the vision of a freedom-respecting liberal state.”Many libertarians argue that we should legalize recreational drugs in the name of freedom and personal autonomy. Drug prohibition, they argue, infringes on personal freedom by denying individuals the liberty to do what they want with their own bodies.This is mistaken. In fact, it is drug legalization that infringes on freedom. Drug prohibition, not legalization, is the real pro-liberty position.Let me explain.The Foundations of FreedomAll should agree that one of the essential responsibilities of government is to protect and promote personal freedom. To that end, governments have an interest in restricting activities that impair, destroy, or otherwise undermine personal freedom.Now, freedom cannot flourish unless certain background conditions are met. Consider an analogy with markets. If a government wants to protect and promote markets, then it must safeguard the conditions that make a market economy possible. These conditions include the protection of life, exchange, contracts, and private property. Without these prerequisites in place, it would be all but impossible for markets to flourish.The same is true of freedom. If the government has a responsibility to protect and promote freedom, then it must also protect and promote the conditions that make it possible. On this point, one essential ingredient of personal freedom is rationality. Choices can only be free if they are made by a person whose cognitive faculties are functioning in the right way. Reason confers on our actions a certain order and intelligibility that make them explicable and coherent. It is what makes our actions ours, such that we are responsible for them. Our ability to act freely is diminished or destroyed if we are unable to deliberate and think coherently, or if we are subject to overwhelming coercive forces.In other words, freedom isn’t just the bare ability to do something; it is the ability to act under the influence of properly functioning cognitive faculties. This point is pivotal in making sense of the legal concepts of consent, coercion, and competence. Young children are unable to enter into legally binding contracts because their cognitive capacities are not fully developed. Likewise, insanity defenses are based on the understanding that cognitively disabled or insane persons cannot be held criminally liable for their actions. There cannot be freedom without rationality.Accordingly, since the government has a responsibility to protect personal freedom, it must also protect and promote a culture that is conducive to clear thinking and discourages impaired thinking. The government, therefore, has a responsibility to restrict activities that impair, destroy, or otherwise undermine clear thinking.Drug Prohibition: Myths and RealitiesSo far I’ve been defending drug restrictions. But the term “restriction” is vague. What kind of restrictions should the government adopt?Answer: the government should prohibit those substances that have no legitimate use aside from recreation. In addition to making them difficult to obtain, prohibition serves to drive up the cost of drugs, which in turn reduces demand by making it more expensive. It’s simply a matter of supply and demand: the more expensive you make something, the less willing people are to buy it. The added threat of legal punishment also serves to drive down demand. Conversely, if something is cheap, legal, and widely available, then people are more inclined to buy it.Drug legalization would make drugs both cheaper and more available, which in turn increases use. A 2015 study in the Journal of Health Economics found that medical marijuana laws increase marijuana use in both adults and adolescents. In adults aged 21 and older, the frequency of binge drinking also increased. Similarly, a 2017 study published in JAMA Psychiatry found that “medical marijuana laws appear to have contributed to increased prevalence of illicit cannabis use and cannabis use disorders.” Increased availability is also associated with increased use of other drugs, including alcohol.Prohibition makes drugs more expensive and less available, which in turn reduces drug use. Alcohol prohibition, which many think ended in failure, actually reduced per capita alcohol consumption by about 30 to 50 percent. Cirrhosis death rates, admissions to state mental hospitals for alcohol psychosis, and arrests for drunk and disorderly conduct also declined dramatically. While is true that alcohol prohibition did ultimately fail, it failed for political reasons. In terms of reducing alcohol use, prohibition was a success. And given that excessive alcohol consumption impairs clear thinking (in addition to the $250 billion annual cost that it imposes on the nation), it is worth asking whether we should bring back some form of stringent alcohol regulation for reasons considered earlier.Of course, not all drugs are used recreationally. Alcohol can be consumed as a mild social lubricant without the intention to get drunk. But this is not true of marijuana, as the whole point of non-medical marijuana use is to get high (and, as we will see, most cases of so-called “medical” use are indistinguishable from recreational use). Nobody smokes a joint wanting to avoid the high. So too with heroin, cocaine, and other drugs. These drugs would be the target of prohibition, since their paradigmatic use is abuse, unlike alcohol.It is true that there will still be some who will go through the effort to illegally obtain drugs even if prohibition is enacted. Perfect compliance, however, isn’t the standard of success when it comes to lawmaking. Laws against murder, assault, and theft don’t stop all of these crimes, but nobody is proposing that we legalize these things.What about Medical Marijuana?My focus has been on recreational drug use, but it is worth briefly discussing so-called “medical” applications of drugs (specifically marijuana), since these are wedge issues that many pro-legalization advocates exploit to sneak in full recreational legalization.There is research showing that cannabis or cannabinoids can help with pain management, nausea and vomiting, and multiple sclerosis spasticity. However, this same research has also found strong evidence that cannabis or cannabinoids can negatively affect respiratory health, lead to the development of schizophrenia or other psychoses, and increase one’s risk of being in a motor vehicle crash. So the putative benefits of marijuana must be weighed against the negative health effects of marijuana use.Additionally, there isn’t really an essential need for medical marijuana, given that there are plenty of other medicines that can address the ailments that marijuana may help with. Thus, while I am open in principle to allowing certain kinds of medical marijuana (provided that it go through the same rigorous process by which other medicines are approved), it would appear to be unnecessary. And, given the health risks of marijuana, it would be ill-advised and reckless to legalize marijuana under the guise of medicine.Indeed, medical marijuana is ripe for abuse. In states with medical marijuana programs, the overwhelming majority of medical marijuana users are young male adults who claim “pain” as the reason for which they need marijuana. Only a tiny percentage use marijuana for other reasons. Pain, of course, is a very vague reason that is easy to fake, so it provides an avenue for recreational users to obtain marijuana under the false banner of medicine. It seems then that medical marijuana programs provide a smokescreen for recreational use that amounts to de facto legalization. So there is a case to be made for extending drug prohibition to so-called medical marijuana.READ MORE: http://www.thepublicdiscourse.com/2018/01/20650/?utm_source=The+Witherspoon+Institute&utm_campaign=1d3e381a50-RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_15ce6af37b-1d3e381a50-84094405Keep up with family issues in NZ. Receive our weekly emails direct to your Inbox.last_img read more

Laudrup: Swansea the place for De Guzman

first_imgMichael Laudrup believes Jonathan de Guzman can fulfil his World Cup ambitions at Swansea, provided Villarreal do not price the Welsh side out of a permanent move for the midfielder. He added: “They may take him back to use him to get some money, but in that situation it is important what the player wants “They can try to do a lot of things but the player only wants to play in Swansea. “He is happy here and wants to stay but we cannot say he will be here for certain, as they could put too high a price on him. “If so we have to start all over again. If he goes back he has two years left on his contract with Villarreal but his desire is to stay here. “He is very aware of what he has to do, through playing here he has got a debut in the national team and there is a World Cup in 15 months. So if you want to be in a squad for that you need to be playing regularly for a club.” Press Associationcenter_img The 25-year-old has grown to become a key player for the Swans since joining on a season-long loan, with his range of passing giving them an extra attacking threat. His form has seen him rewarded by Holland coach Louis van Gaal, who handed the Canadian-born playmaker a first cap in the recent friendly against Italy, putting him in the frame for next year’s World Cup in Brazil. But with Villarreal looking to at least recoup the fee of around £7million they paid to sign De Guzman in 2011, Laudrup knows negotiations for a permanent transfer may not be straightforward, and said: “I can’t say 100 percent what will happen but I don’t think that Jonathan will go back to Villarreal to play.” last_img read more

WHS Daily Bulletin: Modeling agency to offer scholarships to WHS students

first_img Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. There are no comments posted yet. Be the first one! Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Submitted to Sumner Newscow — Today’s Wellington High School bulletin for Monday, Nov. 23, 2015:Monday•Football dinner, 7 p.m.Tuesday•Junior class to Kansas City.Wednesday-Friday•No school, Happy Thanksgiving.Today’s Lunch — Chili, Tortilla Chips, Fresh Veggies, Cinnamon Roll, Pears, Baby Carrots and Milk.Monday’s Lunch — Baked Ham, Potatoes with Brown Gravy, Green Beans, Hot Roll, Pineapple Chunks and Milk.Today’s News: * Volleyball Girls: You need to turn in your uniforms by tomorrow! You can give them to Ms. Hickman.*Crusaders to DC will have a meeting right after school today in room 206.*Football players- Don’t forget about the football banquet TODAY at 7:00 in the commons. Please bring a dessert.*November 30th during lunches a representative from Barbizon Modeling Agency will be here. Scholarships are available through this agency to assist students with college tuition.*Attention Wellington High students! Do you enjoy photography?  Are you a great photographer?  A photography contest is taking place now!  The subject of your photographs can be anything that screams Wellington. Photos must be taken by you this semester.  File size must be at least 16 x 20 inches and cannot be taken with a camera phone. Only 3 entries per person.  Winners photos will be printed and used to decorate USD 353 central offices.  Deadline is Dec 20!  There will be cash prizes! Please submit digital files to Mrs. Groom.*NHS is hosting the winter formal dance on December 4th- 8:30 pm to 11pm. Admission is $5 , or you can bring 5 non perishable items.Fun Fact of the Day:The American Automobile Association estimates that 47 million Americans will travel 50 miles or more from home over the Thanksgiving holiday weekend.Follow us on Twitter.last_img read more