Hubert Lawrence: Why we run the races

first_img Wins in the college men’s discus and the high-school section by Pan-Am Fedrick Dacres of the University of the West Indies and Munro’s Kino Dunkley suggested good things for the future. With the University of Technology (UTech) having an off year, the G.C. Foster College men stepped confidently into the breach with a 4×100 win. Spare a thought for Rayan Holmes of Edwin Allen. Pulled from the start of the Champs 400-metre hurdles final through illness, Holmes redeemed himself with victory in the same event on the last day of the 122-year-old event. The boys’ 4x800m was as enthralling as Holmes’ success was heartwarming. St Jago, winners in the girls’ long jump, through Tissana Hickling, held off STETHS in 7: 33.71 seconds. It was the first win by the school in the 4x800m since 1990. For all of that, and the win by Jamaica’s men in the USA versus the World 4x100m, pride of place goes to JC. Their dominating 4x400m win was a shock. In a meet where most things went with the form book, here was one time where predictions crashed and burned. – HUBERT LAWRENCE has made notes at track side since 1980. OFF YEAR Most things ran according to the script last weekend at the 122nd Penn Relays. Big wins for Edwin Allen High, Kingston College (KC) and St Jago High were predicted by many. There was, however, one event staged inside the chilly Franklin Field venue that proved why we actually run the races. Jamaica College (JC) arrived there as one of the favourites for the Championship boys 4×100 metres, but flubbed the second baton change. Perhaps pressure had been applied by a high-speed second leg by Akeem Bloomfield for KC. The national junior 400-metre record holder helped his school to equal the meet record set by Calabar at 39.63 seconds in bright conditions last year. Hopes for a JC track victory seemed to end there. Calabar and KC held the high cards for the 4x400m, with the impressive TC Williams High School a clear and present danger. Bloomfield was withdrawn due to the threat of injury, and remarkably, a businesslike JC quartet ran the field off its feet in the final. Calabar, the winner at Boys and Girls’ Championships, got an urgent anchor leg out of wonder boy Christopher Taylor. Noah Lyles, runner-up to Taylor at the 2015 World Youth Championships, zoomed his team forward. It was all in vain as Maleik Smith, 200-metre sprinter Michael Campbell, Devaughn Baker and Phillip Lemonios produced a big surprise. Just third at Champs in 3:15.06, the Old Hope Road school blasted that season’s best down to 3:12.34. Though Baker gave them a decisive advantage on the third leg, his team had no baton carries as quick as those by Taylor and Lyles. Smart team running did the trick instead. With the Philly chill slowing sprinters all weekend, the improvement by JC from 3:15.06 at Champs to 3:12.34 at Penns is no mean feat. By contrast, Calabar clocked 3:09.77 seconds at Champs and 3:13.09 on the new track at Franklin Field. The rest of the high-school competition ran to the script, with the JC pair of Clayton Brown and O’Brien Wasome taking the high and triple jumps, respectively, and with Shanice Love of Excelsior High continuing a great season, with a national junior record in the discus.last_img read more

Two North County gas stations cutting prices Monday in campaign against gas

first_imgTwo North County gas stations cutting prices Monday in campaign against gas tax February 4, 2018 KUSI Newsroom Posted: February 4, 2018 KUSI Newsroom, SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — Two North County gas stations will be selling gasoline at reduced prices Monday as part of a signature drive for a campaign that aims to reverse recently enacted fuel taxes.On Monday morning, station owner Linda O’Brien will lower prices at her Mobil gas station — located at 310 Encinitas Blvd in Encinitas — to $2.49 per gallon between 7 and 9 a.m. Customers filling their tanks can sign a petition for a ballot referendum to repeal the new taxes.Between 3 and 6 p.m. Monday, a Shell station at 2509 Palomar Airport Road in Carlsbad will sell gasoline for $1.99 per gallon.In November, gas taxes in the state of California went up by 12 cents. For diesel, the price jumped 20 cents.Former San Diego city councilman Carl DeMaio is behind the campaign to hold a ballot referendum on the taxes.DeMaio will host his KOGO-AM radio show, The DeMaio Report, during the afternoon signature-gathering event. Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Solar Power Puts Dugway Proving Ground on Path to Net Zero

first_img Dan Cohen AUTHOR As Army officials prepare to celebrate the opening next week of a 2-megawatt solar array at Dugway Proving Ground, the installation confirmed plans for the construction of a 3-megawatt array about 20 miles away.When the second array is completed, the two will provide 25 percent of the electrical needs of the test center, administrative buildings and homes at Dugway, located in the West Desert of Utah. That output would meet DOD’s goal of obtaining 25 percent of its electricity from renewable sources and advance the proving ground’s efforts to become a net zero installation, reported Army Public Affairs.“Not only are we on track to meet the Army’s goal, but we are acting as good neighbors with the state of Utah,” said Don Smith, Dugway’s garrison manager. “We will be able to shave of a portion of Rocky Mountain Power’s output during its peak hours, which will benefit everyone.”The first array, which began operations in February, is made up of more than 7,000 solar panels on 10 acres of land. It cost $7.7 million to build.To support its effort to adopt renewables, the proving ground is building a microgrid, which will allow it to operate on stored energy when the commercial grid is down.“With the aging infrastructure of the commercial power grid it became critical that we find an alternate method to ensure an uninterrupted power source,” Smith said.last_img read more

Myanmar cardinal urges Pope to avoid use of term Rohingya

first_imgMyanmar’s most senior Catholic prelate has urged Pope Francis to avoid using the term ‘Rohingya’ during a visit this month, when he is expected to raise the humanitarian crisis faced by the Muslim minority after a Myanmar army offensive in August.The pope is set to visit largely Buddhist Myanmar from Nov. 27 to Nov. 30, before going to Bangladesh, a predominantly Muslim neighbour where more than 600,000 Rohingya have fled to take shelter in refugee camps.In the first visit by a pope to Myanmar, Francis will meet Aung San Suu Kyi, the Nobel peace laureate who leads a civilian administration that is less than two years old, the generals it has to share power with, as well as leading Buddhist monks.Cardinal Charles Maung Bo told Reuters the pope would raise the need to provide assistance to the Muslim minority, saying, “These are people who are suffering and these are the people in need of help now.”Francis has used the term Rohingya when he has spoken about their suffering in the recent past. But Suu Kyi has asked foreign leaders not to use the term Rohingya, because in her view it is inflammatory.Bo, appointed by Pope Francis in 2015 as Myanmar’s first and only cardinal, said church leaders in the country had advised him to sidestep the divisive issue of the name.“We have asked him at least to refrain from using the word ‘Rohingya’ because this word is very much contested and not acceptable by the military, nor the government, nor the people in Myanmar,” Bo said in an interview in Yangon.It was unclear if the pope would heed the advice, Bo added, but if he did so, it would not be to politicise the issue or endorse the Rohingya right to Myanmar citizenship, “but he just wants to identify this particular group who call themselves ‘Rohingya’.”Many people in Myanmar regard the largely stateless Rohingya as illegal immigrants from Bangladesh, and they are excluded from the 135 “national races” recognised by law.Regardless of Myanmar’s sensitivities, however, the United Nations and United States continue to call them Rohingya, upholding their right to self-identify.IMPORTANCE OF DIALOGUEFrancis will highlight the importance of resolving the refugee crisis through dialogue between Myanmar and Bangladesh and with the help of the international community, Bo added.Myanmar has said Rohingya who can prove they were resident would be allowed to return, but the two countries have still to agree how the repatriation should be carried out.“These are the people who do not enjoy the citizenship and are somewhat unwanted in both countries,” said Bo, referring to Myanmar and Bangladesh.“They are also human beings, they have a human face and they also need human dignity, so eliminating or killing any one of them, that’s not justified…,” Bo said, referring to the group as “our brothers and sisters”.Francis will celebrate a mass in Yangon that is expected to draw around 200,000 people, Bo said, adding that Buddhists, Muslims, and those of other faiths were welcome to attend.Myanmar has about 700,000 Roman Catholics, said Bo, from among a population of more than 51 million.The United Nations has denounced the violence in Myanmar’s northwest over the past 10 weeks as a textbook example of ethnic cleansing, a charge Suu Kyi’s administration has denied, while saying accusations of rights abuses should be investigated.Myanmar’s military says its counter-insurgency clearance operation was provoked by Rohingya militants’ attacks on about 30 security posts on Aug. 25.In the following days, the pope spoke about “the persecution of our Rohingya brothers and sisters” and asked Catholics to pray for them, adding that they should be given “their full rights”.last_img read more

Economic Index Shows 15th Slow Month With Some Bright Spots

first_imgThe Houston PMI, as reported by area supply chain leaders, rose from its February level of 44.5 to 45.9 in March. Readings below 50 generally indicate coming contraction.“It absolutely is further indication of contraction,” said Ross Harvison, the ISM Houston Business Survey committee chair. “It’s not surprising to me that we’re seeing people cancelling projects that are not already under construction. The office space that has been built is more than we’re going to need as we continue in this downturn that we’re seeing.”  A development firm that had plans for a 16-story office tower in Midtown on Louisiana has decided to cancel that project, and is now considering leasing the property or developing condos.Despite continued contraction of the Purchasing Managers Index, Harvison says there are some bright spots.“We continue to strength within the healthcare sector. The Houston area has a lot of very strong medical facilities and people are continuing to come to the Houston area for the higher-end healthcare, and that continues to show within our numbers.”  Oil and gas exploration continues to cause the greatest concern for the near-term growth of the Houston economy. Share X 00:00 /01:20 To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listenlast_img read more

Texas Oil And Gas Is Facing A Worker Shortage

first_img Share Bert van Dijk via FlickrA pump jack is seen in Xinjiang Province, China.A Texas oil and gas regulator says the industry can’t hire enough workers largely because of public perception.Railroad Commissioner Wayne Christian spoke at state house hearing on Wednesday.“The biggest threat is the misunderstanding of the oil and gas industry and the acceptance of the politically correct-driven, environmental, anti-oil and gas science,” explained Christian. Christian said he thinks that “misunderstanding” leads to the public school system not pushing enough students toward training programs for energy jobs.At the hearing, Democratic State Rep. Armando Walle noted the Houston-area has many energy training programs, including an “energy high school” at HISD.last_img read more

NPRs Carrie Johnson Talks Covering The Justice Department

first_img 00:00 /10:22 As NPR’s Justice Correspondent, Carrie Johnson covers a wide range of issues, including the investigation into former national security advisor Michael Flynn, and former Attorney General Jeff Sessions stepping down.Johnson is coming to Houston on Saturday, Jan. 26, for the 33rd annual Law & the Media Seminar. The theme of this year’s event is Trending Toward Darkness: Access to Public Records in the Digital Age. She’s the event’s keynote speaker.In the audio above, Johnson tells Houston Matters host Craig Cohen about the challenges reporters like herself face covering the Justice Department, how journalists go about submitting Freedom of Information Act requests, and about the importance of perspective in a world where news events get caught on tape and shared instantly on social media. Listen Share Xcenter_img Linda Fittante/NPRCarrie Johnson covers law enforcement and legal affairs for NPR. To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:last_img read more

Real Estate Movies Retail VR Is Exploding The Opportunities for Entrepreneurs Are

first_img Register Now » Free Webinar | Sept 5: Tips and Tools for Making Progress Toward Important Goals June 22, 2017 7 min readcenter_img The first time I watched an alien newborn claw its way out of a human’s belly — with blood and guts gushing — was 38 years ago, in a Boston cinema. The movie, of course, was Ridley Scott’s Alien, and I was so tense and unhinged at the uber-violent, boundary-pushing scene that I practically broke my boyfriend’s arm.Alien Covenant, the newest in the popular sci-fi franchise, is pushing boundaries again. On Wednesday, virtual reality — that wild, wacky technology — allowed me to watch a short promo for the film depicting, with 360-degree views, an alien birth from the alien’s perspective.This time, little alien arms, viewed from inside the birth sac, tore through the flesh. Internal organs rebelled. And the unfortunate human host — more blood and guts gushing — collapsed dead on a table. Eww…Related: 12 Amazing Uses of Virtual RealityThis promo, courtesy of hardware company AMD and Fox, was just one of some two dozen VR experiences available at The Art of VR conference happening today and tomorrow (June 22-23) at Sotheby’s in New York. While cinematic “storytelling” experiences certainly dominated, the enthusiastic young exhibitors and their headsets offered more than a hint of big, big opportunities ahead for entrepreneurs — creative and commercial alike — smart enough to be paying attention.”The big accounting firms are indicating that the growth rate in VR, whether it’s content creation or hardware, is probably 50 percent a year,” Jim Chabin, president of the event’s sponsoring Advanced Imaging Society, said during an interview. “My background is in television — I was at CBS and in entertainment. If you’re in the entertainment industry, let’s face it: People are cutting their cable cords; primetime television doesn’t attract the audiences it used to; there are only so many people going to the movies.”It’s not like we’re inventing more moviegoers,” he continued. “So virtual reality, augmented reality will be used in industry, will be used by medical, will be used by travel, the restaurant industry, the real estate industry, travel business and the entertainment industry.”The virtual reality industry is still small, acknowledged Chabin, a past president of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, vs. its rather saturated movie and TV industry forerunners. Half of the VR community, he says, are companies with five or fewer employees working on their debut VR offerings.”The number of people working in VR and AR, we think, will double every year at least,” he said. “We think it’s a 10-year build-out for this industry. So if that’s an area to which you devote your efforts, you have a decade of solid growth [ahead].”Chabin’s message — of entrepreneurs not being “left behind,” of the terms “virtual reality” and “augmented reality” coming up more and more in client conversations, of opportunities galore — was echoed by the entrepreneurs demonstrating their VR wares at the event.Kevin Mack, a past Oscar winner for visual effects (What Dreams May Come, 1998) and, more recently, the founder of the VR art company Zen Parade, described his 2-and-a-half-year-old company as equal parts art and commerce. “I’m interested in aesthetics but also altering consciousness in positive ways,” Mack said. “What I make is both fine art and entertainment, but we’re also using it for therapy and medicine.”Related: Virtual Reality Is About to Change Your BusinessMack’s 3D sculptures — viewed via a headset and resembling shiny globs of acrylic paint on canvas, floating in space in a kind of spacious airy world — are almost a meditative experience. According to Mack, his art has been used as a hypno-analgesic to treat pain and anxiety for patients undergoing awake brain surgery, and it’s more effective than traditional applications, he says.That’s why he’s aiming to get drug companies and medical companies on board. “We’re finding our biggest opportunities for the near future are going to be location-based entertainment arcades as well as the medical industry,” Mack said.Those arcades came up by others such as Larry Jones, CEO of Blackthorn Media, whose Dragonflight VR experience had people lining up at a press briefing to “fly” on a dragon’s back, a la Game of Thrones’s Khaleesi. Jones spoke of the franchise company VR Junkies, whose franchisees are setting up quick and relatively cheap storefronts.”Where the market is right now is about games,” Jones said. But movie-style storytelling, he said, is coming on the VR scene more and more. That’s how his 2-year-old company has attracted six Academy Award nominees (and one winner). “We’re taking the imagery and expertise you have with something like [the movie] Life of Pi and putting it into a game,” he said. “It’s kind of like crazy. Crazy good.”The Virtual Reality Company (VRC) also has attracted some high-powered interest. “We have an advisor who’s a really well-known filmmaker,” CEO Guy Primus divulged: “Steven Spielberg.”VRC’s website contains stills from its Art of VR offering, Rukus, a 12-minute family friendly animated VR experience, in which two preteens and their dog travel to a world populated by dinosaurs. Viewers have an extra experience here: Their chairs rumble and vibrate according to the action on the screen. Those motion seats come via the Montreal company D-box (whose vice president, Richard LaBerge, pointed out, “The body has to participate to make it a real virtual reality”). Primus said that 3-year-old VRC is following a theatrical model, where Rukus and other short VR films are being offered, in a premium experience, in theaters for a short time, followed by home release for Sony PlayStation, Oculus VR and other devices. Also coming down the line is a “warehouse” model, where multiple people interact with VR through arcades and popular outlets such as Chuck E. Cheese restaurants.Related: 7 New Opportunities Virtual Reality May CreateThe VR industry is young, it’s entrepreneurial and it’s hot, Primus and other exhibitors at the conference said over and over. They described, among its many applications, VR for real estate home buyers, oil rig fire-prevention training and retail purchases (which Amazon is already incorporating).Not surprisingly, large companies as well as small ones are at the Art of VR event: USA Today showed off its VR offering, an F-18 jet launch off the USS Eisenhower, while Intel — in association with Positron — presented a prelude to its VR movie Le Musk.”For me, as an entrepreneur trying to take the next step, the next media, it’s about VR,” said Jones, the Blackthorn CEO. “There is an industry thirsty for great content, vs. an industry saturated by great content. It’s not about managing decline [like] in digital television and television, where the audience is spread out so far. VR is about managing growth.”And it’s all about growth.” Attend this free webinar and learn how you can maximize efficiency while getting the most critical things done right.last_img read more