We’ve to win – McIntosh says of Jamaica’s remaining Pool E matches at Netball World Cup

first_imgTechnical Director Jill McIntosh said the Sunshine Girls have no room for error in their remaining Pool E games at the Netball World Cup, warning that their opponents are no pushovers.”We have to win our two games to be in the semi-final. We have to win,” McIntosh pointed out. “If we lose, there is no way we will be in the semi-finals, so to win is our focus.”We have to play our best. We have to go out and play our normal style of netball as we have been doing and just take it one game at a time as we go. Uganda are looking good and Malawi are very good,” observed McIntosh, the former Australia coach.Jamaica lost their opening game 55-48 to New Zealand on Tuesday and played Uganda (earlier this morning) in their second match of the group, knowing they had to win to keep their semi-final chances intact.Malawi, in the meantime, had lost to New Zealand 57-49 yesterday.”Malawi only lost to New Zealand by eight (goals), so they are a very good team,” McIntosh noted. “They are number six in the world, so we have to be very careful when we play them on Friday, that one won’t be easy,” she said.Despite that, McIntosh is confident that the Sunshine Girls will have enough in the tank for the two African nations.”We have our tactics worked out, we played them (Malawi) last year at the Commonwealth Games and we know we can beat them, but in saying that we know that they are very good, they have improved again, they play a very nice style of netball, so we have to go out and play our best game,” she continued.New Zealand leads Pool E with maximum four points from two matches, while Malawi follow with two points from two games. Prior to last night’s fixtures, Uganda had lost both their matches, while Jamaica had lost once and were yet to get off the mark.last_img read more

U.S. Court Declares Tom Woewiyu ‘Flight Risk’

first_imgJucontee Thomas WoewiyuThe U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and Federal Bureau of Investigation agents, who arrested Jucontee Thomas Woewiyu last week described the former Liberian Minister of National Defense a ‘flight risk,’ meaning he would escape to Liberia if the bail was accepted.This latest development followed a decision by a U.S. judge to deny him (Woewiyu) bail. This also means that Woewiyu will remain in detention until a new motion is file by a reputable lawyer on his behalf; but no date was set for any motion, this paper has learnt.The former spokesman of the disbanded rebel National Patriotic Front of Liberia (NPFL) was arrested last week at Newark Airport upon his return from Liberia.He was subsequently charged with ‘perjury’—lying on his citizenship application by failing to disclose his alleged affiliation with a “violent political group in Liberia” during the height of the country’s civil crisis, which lasted over a decade. Woewiyu served as Defense Minister in Charles Taylor’s former rebel NPFL, during Liberia’s civil war. Upon his arrest, his immigration lawyer, Raymond Basso, said his client amended his citizenship application to include his participation in the Taylor regime.  But Linwood C. Wright, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Philadelphia, said Judge Judith Faith Angell denied bail, “because she believed Woewiyu might try to leave (runaway) from the U.S. should he be bailed.“There was a detention hearing and Woewiyu was ordered detained by a U.S. Magistrate.  The magistrate found that he (Woewiyu) was a ‘flight risk,’ and so she ordered him detained pending his trial,” Wright said.Raymond Basso, Woewiyu’s immigration lawyer, told VOA last week the case against his client was purely an immigration matter, and that it was a “misconception” (mistaken belief) to suggest that he was being charged with war crimes.Basso said he was confident his client would be exonerated because, although he made a misrepresentation in his first citizenship application, it was later modified to include Woewiyu’s participation in the Taylor regime.Wright said the case is an immigration issue based on Woewiyu’s misrepresentations and non-disclosures under oath regarding his background.“For instance, one of the requirements was that he names all the organizations that he’s been in, political organizations, and he did not report that he was a member of the National Patriotic Front of Liberia,” Wright said.According to him, Woewiyu also checked “No” when asked in his application whether he had ever advocated, either directly or indirectly, the overthrow of a government by force or violence.“Another question was whether he had either directly or indirectly persecuted any group for a number of reasons, including political opinion and social affiliation and he said “No” to that. Of course, the grand jury determined that he was the minister of defense for the NPFL. There was a question with regards to persecution of groups that supported former President (Samuel) Doe when Doe was in power in Liberia,” Wright said.Woewiyu pleaded not guilty at his detention hearing to all counts against him, including perjury and four counts of fraudulent misrepresentation in immigration applications.As the case stands, a barrister in Liberia has told the Daily Observer that Woewiyu would eventually be charged with ‘war crimes’ and be prosecuted accordingly.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more