“UEFA begins to recognize that football is no longer possible this season”

first_imgVan Ranst goes further and considers that it is still too early to talk about dates, he even warns that football will be far from restarting. “How can you talk about downsizing and restarting the competition if we don’t even know if we are on top of the first peak? Soccer is the most important secondary problem in the world. But we must be honest: massive events like soccer games or music festivals will be among the last things we allow again“The UEFA threatened the Belgian Federation and the Jupiler League that if they went ahead with the suspension, Belgium teams could be excluded from European competitions. On April 15, a hearing is scheduled for Belgian football to defend its decision against UEFA. Van Ranst will be present assessing, as a specialist, the consequences of starting football in the short term. Marc van Ranst is a Belgian virologist and professor at the Leuven University. In addition, serving as an advisor to the Jupiler Pro League in the COVID-19 crisisHis reputable opinion allows him to remain in direct contact with UEFA to help him assess the consequences of the coronavirus pandemic.“I have the impression that UEFA is starting to see that playing football is no longer possible this season”, has admitted Van Ranst in statements collected by the Belgian newspaper Het Nieuwsblad.The doctor next week has a telematic hearing with the body, chaired by Aleksandr Ceferin, to support the Belgian league in its decision to definitively suspend the competition. “The peak of infections is far from being reduced. No one can blame the Belgian clubs for making that decision. The Pro League understood that a minimum of three to four weeks of training will be required before matches are possible again. So it is not realistic to finish current competitions“says the Belgian specialist.last_img read more

New marker in the blood could help predict persons risk of developing

first_img Source:https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-us/cancer-news/press-release/2018-08-13-blood-test-could-detect-kidney-cancer-up-to-5-years-earlier Aug 13 2018Scientists have discovered that a marker in the blood could help predict the risk that a person will develop kidney cancer, according to research published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research.Supported by Cancer Research UK, the IARC and the NIH, the work used samples taken as part of the EPIC study to examine the blood of 190 people who went on to develop kidney cancer, compared to 190 controls who did not.They found that measuring levels of a protein molecule in the blood, called KIM-1, could indicate whether a person was more likely to develop kidney cancer over the following 5 years.The data also showed that the greater the concentration of KIM-1, the higher their risk of developing kidney cancer.In people with kidney cancer, KIM-1 levels were also found to be linked with poor survival, as those with the highest levels in their blood were less likely to survive.In the future, the scientists think that testing for blood KIM-1 levels could be used alongside imaging to confirm suspicions of kidney cancer, or help to rule out the disease.Dr David Muller, Cancer Research UK-funded co-first author based at Imperial College London, said: “This work is a big step forward; KIM-1 is the only blood biomarker shown prospectively to distinguish between people at high and low risk of kidney cancer. But there’s a lot more work to do before we could envisage this in the clinic.”The next steps are to look more closely at whether KIM-1 levels can help detect tumors that have a good prognosis, so those at an early stage, and to find out if it could be used as a tool to track whether a patient’s treatment is working.”Related StoriesNew protein target for deadly ovarian cancerStudy: Nearly a quarter of low-risk thyroid cancer patients receive more treatment than necessaryNew research links “broken heart syndrome” to cancerKidney cancer is the 7th most common cancer in the UK and cases are on the rise. When diagnosed at its earliest stage, more than 8 in 10 people will survive their disease for 5 years or more. More than 4 in 10 cases in England are diagnosed at a late stage, however, and just 1 in 10 people survive kidney cancer when diagnosed at the latest stage.Diagnosing the disease earlier therefore has the potential to boost survival, but the majority of early-stage tumors do not present symptoms and many cases are picked up incidentally during imaging for a range of other health conditions.Professor Charles Swanton, Cancer Research UK’s Chief Clinician, said: “The potential of blood tests for the detection and monitoring of cancers is becoming increasingly apparent, and this work offers further evidence that they could become powerful tools in the clinic.”There is a pressing need to shift kidney cancer diagnoses towards earlier stages, when treatment is more likely to be successful, and this promising research is progress towards that goal. This work is still in early stages, so prospective studies of larger populations are needed before this approach could be widely adopted.”Dr Rupal Bhatt, NIH-funded senior author based at Harvard Medical School, said: “It’s now crucial to understand more about how KIM-1 could be incorporated into patients’ treatment.”We’re excited about progressing this important work further and testing whether KIM-1 levels could help identify patients who may benefit from additional treatment after surgery, and therefore potentially improve their outlook.”last_img read more